Upcoming events

About

About

The Partnership boosts the transformation towards a climate-neutral, sustainable, productive and competitive blue economy. We aim to restore the ocean’s health, resilience and services to people by enabling economic activity that is climate-neutral, sustainable and productive.  

Vision

  • by 2030: give the transformation towards a climate-neutral, sustainable, productive and competitive blue economy a boost
  • by 2050: create and support the conditions for a healthy ocean for the people

 

Through this vision we work together to support key EU policy objectives of Green transition, digital transformation and recovery and ultimately contribute to the Sustainable Development Goals.

investments
€ 450
Million planned
investments
over 7 years
partners
60
Partners &
the European Commission
countries
25
Countries

Facts & Figures

Intervention areas 2024

Intervention Areas are set in the Annual Work Programme of the Partnership and are based on the Strategic Research and Innovation Agenda and the Member States and Associated Countries’ priorities. Intervention Areas for future calls and activities will be developed according to an annual cycle. 

Digital Twins of the Ocean

This Intervention Area proposes a multidisciplinary, long-lasting research and innovation activity that focuses on the development of twin technology for spatially limited areas at sea-basin level. The activity aims to improve our understanding of the relations among essential systems at sea-basin level and ultimately support the development of AI based simulation and prediction capabilities for European oceans. 

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Blue Economy Sectors

The Intervention Area covers all sectors of the blue economy, focusing on the prerequisites for a green and digital transition of these sectors and on the conditions for co-existence and multi-use of activities and infrastructures at sea. The main aim of the Intervention Area is to support the optimal use of resources in European oceans and seas in terms of space and material flows while ensuring the conditions for sustainability and reducing environmental pressures. 

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Managing Sea-Uses

The Intervention Area addresses the need for innovative tools and approaches to the sustainable planning and management of sea-uses, interlinking maritime spatial planning (MSP), the marine strategy framework directive (MSFD), common fishery policy (CFP), and the marine protected areas (MPAs) with a focus on the regional dimension. 

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Blue Bioresources

The Intervention Area addresses research and innovation needs to support a just transition to the sustainable production and utilization of blue bioresources, with emphasis on production and processes that minimise the environmental impacts while meeting the demand for healthy and affordable blue food, feed, and other biobased products.

Learn more ➝   

How can you engage?

The Partnership seeks to engage stakeholders across ocean industry sectors, policy, scientific disciplines, and civil society. You can engage in six co-funded calls over the seven-year timeframe 2022-2029. We will further add value with complementary actions and resource mobilisation, including: 

  • research infrastructures 
  • thematic programmes 
  • streamlining other funding sources  

 

As a Partnership, we engage with initiatives at the level of sea basins and the Atlantic Ocean. At global level, we promote the EU approach to a sustainable blue economy. We seek synergies with other Partnerships and the Mission Restore our Seas and Oceans. In parallel, we are establishing a community of practice with different stakeholders to co-design activities. 

Administration

  • Secretariat: Ministry of Universities and Research, Italy - sbep@mur.gov.it
  • Co-coordinator: Research Council of Norway
  • Brussels Cellule
    Kathrine Angell-Hansen, ka@forskningsradet.no
    Julie Olivier, j.olivier@fz-juelich.de
    Angiolo Boncompagni, angiolo.boncompagni@est.mur.gov.it
    Maurice Heral, maurice.heral@agencerecherche.fr

Sea basin nodes

  • Atlantic Ocean
    Ireland, Majbritt Bolton-Warberg, majbritt.bolton-warberg@marine.ie
    Portugal, Natalia Ospina-Alvarez, natalia.ospina@aircentre.org
  • Baltic Sea
    Estonia, Rene Reisner, rene.reisner@envir.eem, Eve Külmallik , Eve.Kylmallik@agri.ee, Liis Kikas, liis.kikas@envir.ee
    Poland, Monika Wloszek, monika.wloszek@ncbr.gov.pl
  • Black Sea
    Bulgaria, Milen Baltov, mbaltov@bfu.bg
    Turkey, Ebru Aydin, ebru.aydin@tubitak.gov.tr
  • Mediterranean Sea
    Greece, Argiro Karahaliou, akarah@gsrt.gr
    Malta, Maria Azzopardi, maria.azzopardi.2@gov.mt
  • North Sea
    Belgium, Ann-Katrien Lescrauwaet, ann.katrien.lescrauwaet@vliz.be
    Netherlands, Lisette Enserink, lisette.enserink@rws.nl

Partners

Brazil

Denmark

Faroe Islands

The Netherlands

The Netherlands

The Netherlands

The Netherlands

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Additional activities

Additional activities

In addition to our core initiatives, we believe in the power of collaboration and engagement to create a lasting positive impact on our oceans and coastal communities. That's why we offer a range of additional activities that complement our mission and provide opportunities for individuals, organizations, and businesses to get involved.

Ocean literacy

The Partnership will add a complementary perspective to environmentally driven ocean literacy efforts by promoting the changes in behaviours and attitudes needed to enable the just and sustainable transformation of Europe’s blue economy. This can generate interest in Europe in sustainable maritime innovations, career options, investment opportunities, and generally the quest of reconciling economic development with marine ecological integrity. Industry actors will be targeted  to help embed the  corporate environmental responsibility needed to affect the transition. The thematic foci will be guided by the Intervention Areas and align with the EU4Ocean Coalition. 

The partnership will also offer webinars about ocean literacy and communication science, and provides an ocean literacy toolkit to enable partnership beneficiaries to improve public knowledge and appreciation about their work and the opportunities in the blue economy domain. 

The Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership Ocean Literacy Toolkit is intended both for its funded projects and for the stakeholder community at large. The Toolkit will support integrating and enhancing ocean literacy efforts in their activities to promote the behavioural changes needed to enable the just transition to a sustainable blue economy in Europe.   

The toolkit is a collection of resources, including links to informative reports, networking platforms and initiatives on ocean literacy at the regional (EU4Ocean) and international (UN Ocean Decade) levels.

Reports: 

UN Ocean Decade:

EU4Ocean:

Exploitation and Impact Network

The aim of the network is to develop tools and actions to transfer new knowledge and increase impact of the co-funded R&I projects at local, national and European level, taking into consideration different target groups: policy makers, civil society and marine and maritime industry. 

Ultimately, the Exploitation and Impact Network will contribute to a better co-creation and knowledge transfer between research industry, policy makers, and citizens by:  

  • making impact pathways mandatory at the project level;  

  • developing Open Access strategy and addressing Intellectual Property Rights;  

  • increasing the impact on the target groups needs through capacity building of the applicants to the call;  

  • promoting innovative solutions and accelerate their market uptake;  

  • bridging science policy gaps to maximise impact. 

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Burgas Free University

Abbreviated organisation name
BFU
Address

8001, Burgas, 62 San Stefano Street

Countries
email
mbaltov@bfu.bg
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Contact

Contact

Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership

The Partnership is coordinated by Italy, with Norway as co-coordinator.

Coordinator:
Ministry of University and Research (Italy) - sbep@mur.gov.it

Co-coordinator: Research Council of Norway

Communication: info@bluepartnership.eu

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Administration

  • Secretariat: Ministry of Universities and Research, Italy - sbep@mur.gov.it
  • Co-coordinator: Research Council of Norway
  • Brussels Cellule
    Kathrine Angell-Hansen, ka@forskningsradet.no
    Julie Olivier, j.olivier@fz-juelich.de
    Angiolo Boncompagni, angiolo.boncompagni@est.mur.gov.it
    Maurice Heral, maurice.heral@agencerecherche.fr

Sea basin nodes

  • Atlantic Ocean
    Ireland, Majbritt Bolton-Warberg, majbritt.bolton-warberg@marine.ie
    Portugal, Natalia Ospina-Alvarez, natalia.ospina@aircentre.org
  • Baltic Sea
    Estonia, Rene Reisner, rene.reisner@envir.eem, Eve Külmallik , Eve.Kylmallik@agri.ee, Liis Kikas, liis.kikas@envir.ee
    Poland, Monika Wloszek, monika.wloszek@ncbr.gov.pl
  • Black Sea
    Bulgaria, Milen Baltov, mbaltov@bfu.bg
    Turkey, Ebru Aydin, ebru.aydin@tubitak.gov.tr
  • Mediterranean Sea
    Greece, Argiro Karahaliou, akarah@gsrt.gr
    Malta, Maria Azzopardi, maria.azzopardi.2@gov.mt
  • North Sea
    Belgium, Ann-Katrien Lescrauwaet, ann.katrien.lescrauwaet@vliz.be
    Netherlands, Lisette Enserink, lisette.enserink@rws.nl

Exploitation and Impact Network

The aim of the network is to develop tools and actions to transfer new knowledge and increase impact of the co-funded R&I projects at local, national and European level, taking into consideration different target groups: policy makers, civil society and marine and maritime industry. 

Ultimately, the Exploitation and Impact Network will contribute to a better co-creation and knowledge transfer between research industry, policy makers, and citizens by:  

  • making impact pathways mandatory at the project level;  

  • developing Open Access strategy and addressing Intellectual Property Rights;  

  • increasing the impact on the target groups needs through capacity building of the applicants to the call;  

  • promoting innovative solutions and accelerate their market uptake;  

  • bridging science policy gaps to maximise impact. 

Federal Science Policy Office

Abbreviated organisation name
BELSPO
Address

Boulevard Simon Bolivar 30 bte 7, 1000 Brussels

Countries
email
David.COX@belspo.be
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Feedback survey - Non-participants - 1st Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership

Feedback survey - Non-participants - 1st Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership

Thank you for taking the time to answer our survey. Your valuable insights are instrumental in our continuous improvement efforts. We appreciate your contribution towards making future events even more successful and fulfilling for all participants.

 

What were your reasons for deciding not to attend the event?

Feedback survey - Participants at the 1st Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership Symposium

Feedback survey - Participants at the 1st Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership Symposium

Your insights are instrumental in our continuous improvement efforts. We appreciate your contribution towards making future events even more successful. 

 

1. Is your institution one of the 60 members of the Partnership consortium?

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Funding opportunities

Funding opportunities

The partnership is launching six co-funded calls for research and innovation proposals over a seven-year timeframe. All open calls can be found below. 

Open calls

The Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership’s second joint transnational call
Pre-announced
Launched
Open for submission of pre-proposals
Evaluation pre-proposals
Open for submission of full proposals
Evaluation of full proposals
Closed
Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership’s first joint transnational call
Pre-announced
Launched
Open for submission of pre-proposals
Evaluation pre-proposals
Open for submission of full proposals
Evaluation of full proposals
Closed

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Fundo Azul

Abbreviated organisation name
FA
Address

Av. Dr. Alfredo Magalhães Ramalho N.6 1495-165 Algés

Countries
email
catarina.resende@dgpm.mm.gov.pt
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Homepage

The Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership

The Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership represents an unprecedent effort of 60 Partner institutions from 25 countries and the European Commission to pool research and innovation investments and align national programmes at pan-European scale. As a Horizon Europe co-funded partnership, its strategy takes into consideration the R&I agendas of the sea basins (Mediterranean, Black Sea, Baltic and North Sea) and the Atlantic Ocean and builds on lessons learned from previous initiatives.    

investments
€ 450
Million planned
investments
over 7 years
partners
60
Partners &
the European Commission
countries
25
Countries

News

Get to know our first projects

20 Feb 2024
min.

The 19 projects selected in the first joint transnational call have been invited to present themselves through this digital poster exhibition. The exhibition will be updates as we receive new posters. To navigate between posters, please hover over the image and click the arrows. 

Re-experience the "Charting the course towards a Sustainable Blue Economy" Symposium

13 Feb 2024
min.

The first Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership Symposium took place on 13-14 February 2024. If you missed the event, or would like to re-experience parts of it, you can now watch the recorded sessions at your own convenience. The Symposium brought together thought leaders, experts, and practitioners to promote the transformation towards a sustainable blue economy. 

Partnership launches second joint transnational call

2 Feb 2024
min.

The Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership is pleased to announce its second joint transnational call entitled “Unified Paths to a Climate-Neutral, Sustainable, and Resilient Blue Economy: Engaging Civil Society, Academia, Policy, and Industry».

Visit the call page for more information ->

Partnership decides on first batch of co-funded projects

20 Dec 2023
min.

Nineteen projects are selected for funding in response to the Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership’s first co-funded call ‘The way forward: a thriving sustainable blue economy for a brighter future.’

Paving the way for the blue transformation

26 Oct 2023
min.

Experts from across sectors and disciplines participated in a series of workshops organised by the Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership this autumn. Among them were three thematic forward-looking workshops where participants reflected on the state of play and developed recommendations for the future of the Partnership, as it is updating its Strategic Research and Innovation Agenda (SRIA).  

The Partnership Intervention Areas for activities in 2024

26 Oct 2023
min.

The General Assembly of the Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership on 19 October approved four Intervention Areas that will guide the partnership’s co-funded calls and activities in 2024. These areas point to needs for Research & Innovation activities and investments that support the necessary transformation into a green and digital ocean economy. 

Fostering research, development, and innovation for a sustainable blue economy

26 Sep 2023
min.

Brussels, 26 September 2023 - The Waterborne Technology Platform and the Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership (SBEP) announced enhanced cooperation which underlines both players’ firm commitment to develop a sustainable blue economy. 

94 pre-proposals for the 1st call

29 Jun 2023
min.

The Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership received 94 pre-proposals in the 1st joint transnational call. The deadline for pre-proposals in the call  “The way forward: a thriving sustainable blue economy for a brighter future” was 14 April 2023. The results of the pre-proposal evaluation will be later confirmed in mid-July. Shortlisted consortia will be invited to submit full proposals by 13 September. 

Kickoff meeting highlights

  • Press
  • FP1
17 May 2023
3 min.

More than 150 participants from 32 different countries took part in the kickoff meeting for the Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership in Rome on 25th January 2023.

 

Partnership kicks off in Rome

  • FP1
25 Jan 2023
min.

From 23 to 25 January, the network of 60 Partners from 25 countries and the European Commission gathers in Rome to discuss and showcase its planned activities.

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Events

Intervention Area: Blue Bioresources

Intervention Area: Blue Bioresources

This Intervention Area addresses research and innovation needs to support a just transition to the sustainable production and utilization of blue bioresources, with emphasis on production and processes that minimise the environmental impacts while meeting the demand for healthy and affordable blue food, feed, and other biobased products.  

 

 

Image removed.

Background and rationale 

The EU Green Deal sets the context for Europe’s blue economy to become sustainable and climate-neutral by 2050. The Blue Bioeconomy represents an important component of the broader blue economy, delivering food, feed and bio-based products for internal and export markets. With the completion of the Horizon 2020 BlueBio ERA-Net in 2023, the SBEP becomes a key implementing mechanism in Horizon Europe for blue bioeconomy R&D. To achieve sustainability, it is important to consider all stages of the bioresources value chain, from production (capture fisheries, aquaculture) to seafood processing, extracting value from waste streams, developing new types of biomasses, new food and non-food products, as well as advanced extraction technologies such as those used in biorefineries. Cooperation will be sought with the FutureFoodS partnership, which will focus on the post-farming and -fishing part of food systems. 

Key considerations to be taken on board in this Intervention Area include the importance of engaging with industry and stakeholders and if relevant, the application of multi/trans-disciplinary approaches to address complex challenges, including social sciences and humanities.  

Key thematic areas 

Sustainable Fisheries and Harvesting    

Overexploitation and the cumulative impact of overfishing with the effects of pollutants, climate change and other drivers on susceptible species and ecosystems is leading to unsustainable scenarios for the next decades. To bring Europe's fish stocks back to sustainable levels, there are important challenges remaining. More food, feed or biotic resources for other purposes can be obtained from more targeted fisheries and harvesting by improved management of overfished stocks, optimized fishing technologies and practices to reduce bycatch and discards, and increased fishing and harvesting of underutilised species (i.e., zooplankton, other invertebrates, macroalgae). A forward-looking ecosystem-based management approach under EU legislation yet tailored to local conditions will reduce adverse impacts of fishing and harvesting on marine ecosystems, particularly sensitive species, and on vulnerable habitats. The sustainability of mesopelagic fisheries is still being assessed and there is a unique opportunity to ensure that EBM is embedded from the outset. New digital tools such as remote electronic monitoring systems, catch reporting using mobile applications, ecosystem modelling and artificial intelligence tools can optimize both small- and large-scale fishing operations. At the same time such technologies can enable data collection and analysis that can support development of sustainable management practices, while providing full traceability for our seafood. Assessments and solution scenarios should consider the impact and social implications of combined drivers such as habitat degradation, pollution, warming, water stratification and acidification, as well as their effects, such as changes in ecosystem composition, higher frequency of toxic algal blooms and alterations with species migration and phenology. 

Activities should address the following aspects: 

  • Integrated approaches to innovation for fishing vessels to improve vessel operations and practices including technology for e.g., location (also to contrast illegal fisheries), and water characteristics, catch logistics, while reducing the use of fossil fuels.  

  • Exploring and co-developing with industry the potential for new fishing techniques, technologies, and new resources for small-scale fisheries, and seaweed harvesting.  

  • Research to inform policy options and management of migratory fish stocks that spend different parts of their life cycle in different jurisdictions. This is a critical issue for the EU Common Fisheries Policy and co-management of stocks between EU and third countries.  

  • Supporting the application of ecosystem-based management approaches to inshore and small-scale fisheries management.  

  • Understanding the impacts of climate change and human activities including pollution on commercial fisheries, fish stocks and other species with commercial potential. 

  • Understanding cross-compliance, alignment and trade-offs between fisheries policy and management with other policy domains (MSP, MSFD, WFD) and the implications of measures associated with the EU Nature Restoration Law on fishing and fishers.   

  • Technological advancements to preserve the nutritional value and use for new types of catch or harvest.  

  • Increased R&I efforts to improve the understanding of species’ role in the trophic webs, as well as their growth potential as seen in an integrated sustainability and biodiversity-resilience perspective, including the knowledge in concrete management solutions (based on managers’ needs). 

  • Understanding the social and economic drivers of change in commercial fisheries to inform both fisheries, economic and regional development policy and planning. 

  • R&I that supports new digital tools for monitoring for well-informed and timely decision making and sustainable management considering the impact and societal costs of stressors such as habitat degradation, pollution, and climate change.  

  • Development of more selective fishing gears that reduce environmental impact, particularly in the bottom-contact fisheries, and for harvesting new species including macroalgae. Focus can also be on improving fish welfare and increasing traceability. 

 

Aquaculture 

Production of safe, secure food and sustainable bioproducts through aquaculture, has a margin for improvements in respect of diversification, competitiveness, and environmental performance. Aquaculture production should be rethought to satisfy growing consumer demand for blue food, as well as the need for innovative blue bioproducts, while enhancing the social, economic, and environmental sustainability and carbon neutrality of the production. This requires targeted technological advancements and diversified production solutions also considering regional and local differences throughout Europe. Integrated multitrophic aquaculture (IMTA), off-shore production, closed systems, or land-based infrastructure with use of recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS), are options for culturing of established and new species. Diversification of species, in particular the expansion and production of organisms of the primary and/or low trophic levels, face several challenges that need technological advancements. For macroalgae there is a need for R&I that supports spatial considerations as well as new offshore production techniques that require further development and facilities, including larger-scale farms, mechanisation, and methods for further processing after harvest. The new and modified technological and digital systems should favour and promote the health and welfare and quality of the farmed fish. 

Activities should address the following aspects: 

  • Challenges and opportunities associated with further development and expansion of seaweed production, including but not limited to environmental concerns, e.g., light, nutrients’ uptake, vectors for diseases, parasites and spread of invasive species; risk of genetic impact on wild seaweed populations; challenges of insufficient seed quality and varying nutritional levels; food safety challenges due to bioaccumulation of heavy metals; new methods for processing harvested seaweed, taking into account the subsequent value chain (e.g. through biorefinery).  

  • Development of biologically, technically, and economically feasible onshore recirculating aquaculture systems opportunities for fish, shellfish, and seaweed. 

  • Challenges and opportunities associated with mollusc production, including but not limited to algal blooms as potential threats for food safety; cost/benefits for longer distance offshore production. 

  • Innovative alternative solutions to produce established and new species, including integrated multitrophic aquaculture, new systems associated with other economic off-shore activities, closed or land-based systems.   

  • New high value and sustainable feed sources to ensure sufficient and balanced feeds that promote fish quality, health, and welfare. 

  • Challenges and opportunities for growth in fed mariculture, including but not limited to sustainable and healthy feed, fish health optimization environmental concerns, and food safety issues due to bioaccumulation and biomagnification of xenobiotics.  

 

Enabling a circular blue bioeconomy 

Transitioning to a circular blue bioeconomy, whereby the entire biomass of fish, shellfish and seaweed sourced from capture fisheries and aquaculture is utilised, presents both challenges and opportunities. Current policy and regulation can be a barrier to developing new bio-products from waste or side streams (by-catch, rest raw materials etc.), and there is a growing body of evidence to support policy reform. New, sustainable, high-value products can be developed through a biorefinery approach, by e.g., valorisation of waste streams, and contributes to minimising waste and enhancing the value chain. Further exploration of the synergies between blue (aquatic farming) and green (agriculture) is another opportunity in a fully circular blue bioeconomy. For example, side streams from agriculture could be used in aquaculture or bio stimulants derived from marine sources could be used in agriculture. New solutions are also needed for existing challenges e.g., seaweed as bioplastic.  

Activities should address the following aspects: 

  • Opportunities for developing new sustainable bio-based products (food/feed/chemical/pharmaceutical/material) or services to accelerate the ocean economy and provide solutions for existing challenges.  

  • Post-harvest or processing technology to overcome sensory and other drawbacks to increase consumer acceptance for new products.   

  • R&I in support of traceability of bio-based products from marine sources through digitalisation. 

  • R&I that supports policy reform with respect to regulations on use of waste or side streams for a variety of new bio-based products (food/feed/chemical/pharmaceutical/nutraceutical/material). 

 

Implementation, enablers, and synergies  

R&I topics will be formulated for calls for proposals, where projects will be expected to involve a broad range of scientific disciplines, industry partners, citizens, and policy stakeholders order to meet the stated objectives and the quadruple helix ambition. Relevant additional activities could include bringing together diverse marine stakeholder to co-develop objectives, assessing the access and status of research, testing, and demonstration facilities, or supporting the uptake of innovative solutions. 

Synergies and complementarity will be sought through dialogue with other relevant and potential overlapping initiatives, particularly EU partnerships Biodiversa+, FutureFoodS, Water4All, and Animal Health and Welfare; actions under the Mission Restore our Oceans and Waters (Mission Ocean); the Circular Bio-based Europe Joint Undertaking (CBE-JU) and Waterborne platform. It is important to ensure that new knowledge, products, or services stemming from Cluster 5 and 6 calls are taken up in relevant blue sectors (by both production and value chain stakeholders). 

Outcomes and Impacts 

  • Examples of outcomes from R&I investment in this area: Sustainably produced, nutritious, affordable and climate friendly blue food; diversification of food, feed and other feedstock for products with focus on lower trophic levels; more healthy food, fish, fish stocks and healthier marine ecosystems; improved production efficiencies, for seafood products; greater understanding of the impacts of climate change and human activities on commercial fisheries and fish stock; value chain approaches; aquatic bio-productions that are regionally adapted, well integrated into area-based management, with more selective and less damaging fishing techniques; deployment of new technical solutions, digital, nature-based and social innovations as well as community-led and purpose-driven technology for the blue food sectors.  

  • Environmental impacts: reduced overfishing by supporting legislation to reducing fishing pressure on overexploited species; optimized technology for reduced bycatch and disincentivising its exploitation; supporting the industry shift towards carbon neutrality by development of more selective and less energy-consuming technologies and procedures​; Reduced impact of fisheries on marine habitats​. 

  • Social impacts: more informed consumers​; improved understanding of social and economic drivers of change in the blue bioeconomy and in economic and regional development policy and planning; uptake of innovative fishing gear​ 

  • Economic impacts: productive and competitive greening of the fisheries, aquaculture and processing sectors​; improved traceability and labelling of blue food​; increase in the number of blue-green companies, products, processes and services​; reduced import dependencies and strengthened tech industries; policy and management options to inform EU (CFP) and third-party negotiations in respect of migratory species.  

 

 

Intervention Area: Blue Economy Sectors

Intervention Area: Blue Economy Sectors

The main aim of this Intervention Area is to support the development of Blue Economy sectors and the optimal use of resources in European oceans and seas in terms of space and material flows while ensuring the conditions for sustainability and reducing environmental pressures. 

 

 

Image removed.

Background and rationale 

The ocean industries face several common challenges which can be tackled more efficiently by stimulating cross-sectorial technological cooperation and ensure the transitions needed. The key drivers of technological development are sustainability, safety in operation, green and cost-efficient solutions. 

Within the broader policy framework of the Partnership, the aim of the Intervention Area is to bolster long-term sustainable purpose-driven technological innovations. The Intervention Area is not limited to any sector or activity but covers the entire blue economy, focusing on the prerequisites for a green and digital transition of these sectors and on the conditions for co-existence and multi-use of activities and infrastructures at sea. Through this Intervention Area the Partnership will support marine and maritime contributions to curbing greenhouse gas emissions towards net zero and solutions for climate related mitigation and adaptation (e.g., Ocean-Based Carbon Dioxide Removal) that strengthen societal and economic resilience against climate-change impacts. The Intervention Area focuses on actions that will bring us closer to sustainability, whether in relation to materials (cf., EU Waste Framework Directive, Critical Raw Materials initiative) and/or helping to minimise conflicts deriving from the demands for space at sea or at the coast. 

The activities within the Blue Economy sectors represent highly complex multi-actor social-ecological systems. The transition of these sectors will therefore include broad industrial stakeholder involvement and a diversified funding strategy. Common challenges within all highlighted target areas include regulatory and legal constraints and opportunities, social acceptance of the developments for existing and emerging sectors, socio-economic considerations for a just transition, and broad and inclusive approaches based on principles of social innovation (attitudes and perceptions; learning, networking, and collaboration; and scale, scope, and resonance). Other common challenges are related to corporate social responsibility and social acceptance and license to operate, and the need for new or improved tools and regimes to manage complex safety, security and risk conditions arising from increased co-existence and multi-use structures, including considering biodiversity and cross sectoral issues.  

Key thematic areas 

This Intervention Area contains two strongly connected sub-areas. There are equally strong linkages with the intervention areas on digital twin solutions, and on marine spatial planning. The focus here is on the material and spatial intervention aspects. 

1. Transitioning the Blue Economy 

Actions under this Intervention Area should emphasise technology and process development, solution orientation, and integrated approaches to develop the sustainable Blue Economy in the context of climate change and natural hazard challenges. Projects and their clusters should plan a clear path (e.g., value chain perspective) from new knowledge and innovative services and/or products, to a possible service offer to end-users and how to address demands by end-users. 

There are several critical needs that require specific attention and investment to advance nature-based solutions (NBS) for ocean-based carbon dioxide removal (CDR) in their biotic (e.g., seaweed cultivation, artificial upwelling) or abiotic (ocean alkalinity enhancement) shape. Activities should address the following aspects: 

  • Tools, techniques, and processes, such as ocean sensors to track NBS impacts, methods for cultivating and sinking seaweed and risk assessments. 

  • Developing sufficient understanding for scientists and policymakers to assess overall environmental, social and economic impacts (including multi-use) on the ocean and society. 

  • Creation of markets and business models: identification of opportunities for profit within appropriate bounds of social license. 

 

The high material intensity of maritime activities, taking account of rapid changes in energy systems, requires full consideration of transition to circularity for existing and upcoming sea-based activities. As an example, the rapid development and expansion of offshore wind requires intensified R&I to better understand the environmental impacts (example: marine habitats and ecosystems, migration routes for birds) and possible technical solutions to alleviate negative impacts). Activities should address the following aspects: 

  • Decommissioning options in existing and upcoming segments of the energy sector at meso (type) and macro (sector segment) level. 

  • Business models for possible investment mechanisms to facilitate the re-use of installations addressed from a legal, environmental, and economical perspective. 

  • Innovation for reducing environmental externalities of new installations and of options for future decommissioning at micro (installation) and meso (type) level, and reuse of materials. 

  • ‘Materials and Nature-Based Solutions’: compatibilities and incompatibilities of material uses in view of enhancing natural functions and/or enabling reuse and recycling. 

 

2. Improve co-existence and multi-use infrastructures 

In view of the increasing demand for space, activities and functions at sea, multi-use spatial concepts, including multi-use infrastructures, brings a potential for synergistic benefits for associated sectors. At the same time, the risk of conflicts and negative environmental effects needs to be minimised. Any multi-use of installations or space increases the complexity compared to a ‘single-use’ situation and requires cost-benefit analysis to understand and valorise its economic and social value chain (e.g., research and innovation, new job profiles, diversification of the tourism sector) and make informed decisions as to its benefit for society and the environment. As an example, industry actors can support multi-use by proposing possible investment mechanisms to facilitate the re-use of installations from a legal, environmental, and economical perspective.  

Crowding of space may result in industrial activities moving to further offshore areas, and climate change will generate a more hostile environment for marine and maritime operations (higher sea states, more frequent extreme events). Activities should address the following aspects: 

  • How to deal with increased challenges for operations and platforms, for which management and monitoring of operations will need intelligent, faster, and more reliable control systems for remote intervention, including data simulation of potential accidents and spills, efficient strategies for prevention/containment, and consequent environmental remediation approaches.  

  • Mechanisms to promote sustainable, safe and secure coexistence of several spatial functions and activities within the Blue Economy, and how to address such coexistence within the legal, economic, social, managerial, and policy context. 

  • How to combine infrastructure, functions, and logistics: For example, energy produced at sea can be used for aquaculture farms, hydrogen production, and desalinization, whereas hydrogen can also be used as a vector to transfer energy on shore, or to refuel ships propelled by hydrogen.  

 

Implementation, enablers, and synergies  

Direct engagement with stakeholders from the industry is foreseen to reflect the range of sectors addressed within this Intervention Area. R&I activities will involve multiple domains including mathematics/physics, maritime, marine and aquaculture sciences, science diplomacy, economics, legal studies, and political sciences, and extend to research infrastructures and their authorities responsible at national level, and NGOs. Co-creation is foreseen by aligning activities with those of the EU Mission 'Restore our Ocean and Waters' and their regional lighthouses.  

A range of tools are foreseen to enable R&I, including Knowledge Hubs, fora with industry to understand gaps and needs, capacity building for countries without expertise in marine structures, and R&I call(s). A successful implementation will need the support of innovative NBS and purpose-driven and smart digital technologies, e.g., simulations, risk assessments and planning purposes, automated data collection and monitoring, models, taxonomy. There is good potential for engagement of in-kind infrastructures such as test-basins, simulation facilities, Digital Twin technologies, and research platforms. 

Outcomes and Impacts 

  • Examples of outcomes from R&I investment in this area: solutions for curbing greenhouse gas emissions, targeting climate neutrality in the Blue Economy, strengthening societal and economic resilience against climate-change impacts, and targeting climate neutrality from marine and maritime infrastructures. Improved assessments of ecological dynamics versus socioeconomic needs; New knowledge, tools, information, platforms and incentives to support actors from all sectors to drive the just and inclusive transition; piloting of multi-use structures; science-based recommendations for blue economic development to policymakers; support for bio- and ecological observation networks through multi-use of structures. 

  • Environmental impacts: Improved marine biodiversity & ecosystems and increased clean energy generation; More agile frameworks developed to cater to environmental challenges; Increased uptake of nature-based solutions; Increased resilience of the whole ecosystems (including fisheries) 

  • Social impacts: Generation of sustainable blue growth and markets in alignment with stakeholder interests and consumers’ rights; opportunities for new working life skills and knowledge; social acceptance of improved and new uses of ocean structures, including within the Blue Economy sectors, is achieved, and affected citizens and workers are engaged in the development. 

  • Economic impacts: generation of sustainable blue markets and opportunities; introduction into the EU legislation the allocation of areas devoted to renewable energy production. 

 

 

Intervention Area: Digital Twins of the Ocean

Intervention Area: Digital Twins of the Ocean

The concept approach of this Intervention Area is the development and validation of Digital Twins of the Ocean (DTOs) at sub-basin scale. It is a multidisciplinary, long-lasting research and innovation activity that focuses on the development of twin technology for spatially limited areas at sea-basin level. The activity aims to improve our understanding of the relations among essential systems at sea-basin level and ultimately support the development of AI based simulation and prediction capabilities for European oceans. 

 

 

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Background and rationale 

The development of digital twins, including DTOs, offers realistic digital representations of assets, processes, or systems in the built or natural environment. DTOs enable users to provide answers to “what if” questions in the context of ocean development, a sustainable blue economy and effective maritime spatial planning. By combining large amount of data and information with data-driven models for relevant sea systems and their interdependency DTO applications will allow for user-driven scenario building of effects of natural processes and anthropogenic activities on the marine environment. This ability will enhance planning rapid responses to unexpected events at sea and provide innovative, interactive, and user-driven tools available to citizens, entrepreneurs, scientists, and policymakers.  

The concept approach of this Intervention Area – the development and validation of DTOs at sub-basin scale – is a multidisciplinary, long-lasting research and innovation activity. The initial focus will be on some spatially limited areas at sea-basin level at low TRL to improve our understanding of the relations among the essential processes and system components of the marine environment. The aim is to develop holistic types of DTOs that include and model all essential systems and their interactions: circulation and currents, waves, tides, interaction with the atmosphere, but also seabed and sediments, coasts and estuaries, animal and plant life, the ecosystem, and socio-economic activities and impacts. DTO applications for scenarios should connect to the marine environment but also to blue economy activities at local level. The development of accurate, validated, holistic DTOs at sub-basin scale will include several phases, notably the selection of targeted sub-basins, the collection of relevant data for these areas, the development of data-driven AI models representing the essential processes that characterize these basins, and the evaluation of the mutual interactions among the systems. Further steps include the combination with existing physics-based models, the development of digital systems and new sensors, development of a data-lake for storage of constantly increasing and heterogeneous data (to feed the AI simulators), the development of the framework for computation of multidisciplinary equilibrium among the systems, and numerical solution via large High-Performance Computing (HPC) architectures. Finally, this DTO approach will require constant test and validation of models' predictions, as well as specialized tools for access, rapid analysis, and dynamic visualization of the data and the predicted solutions.    

This Intervention Area is complementary to the European Digital Twin of the Ocean (European DTO) under the EU Mission Restore our Ocean and Waters and will complement key initiatives such as the EDITO library of models/ EMODnet and ILIAD.   The activity is closely linked with the assessment and improvement the EU observing system under EOOS, and it will require deployment and coordination with ocean related ESFRI Research Infrastructures. 

Key thematic areas 

Actions under this Intervention Area will be dedicated to development of DTO models at sub-basin scale, i.e., spatially limited areas within sea-basins. This will provide accurate information on the limits and knowledge gaps of single/interconnected sub-modules (physical, biogeochemical, ecosystem, socio-economic) and details for integrating spatial hierarchical models. Activities should address the following aspects: 

  • Mapping and understanding user requirements for models, based on input from relevant communities (research, business, management), and turning this knowledge into applications based on stakeholder requirements. 

  • Identifying and assessing data gaps and available data and doing uncertainty quantification of the data and models relevant to selected use cases at a sub-sea-basin scale. 

  • New sensors and innovative approaches to fill identified data gaps to provide more and more accurate information on sub-systems. 

  • Understanding the essential systems characterizing one selected area and mapping the need for additional AI models where existing models do not apply.  

  • General frameworks for exchanging information between models.  

 

A close scientific and expert cooperation and coordination is needed to ensure appropriate timing, complementarities, convergence, and interoperability with other ongoing and planned DTO initiatives, notably under the EU Mission “Restore our Ocean and Waters”, Horizon Europe actions (Cluster 6), national projects, and DTO core infrastructures. 

Implementation, enablers, and synergies 

In addition to cash calls for R&I proposals, there is good potential for in-kind contribution and engaging observing systems and national monitoring efforts to ensure harmonization of data collection and better coverage and frequency of measurements to improve the fundamental modelling. 

Relevant SRIA enablers for achieving the targets include FAIR data; SSH integration and social innovation, considering the socioeconomic and coastal community aspects of area specific modelling; training activity that address human capacity needs; social innovation and rules for practical applications; sustainable financing of infrastructures.  

Synergies will be sought with activities under Horizon Europe, including EU Mission actions, Copernicus, EOOS, UN Decade, Mercator, DITTO, ILIAD, and EMODnet, relevant RIs, and national projects and activities. 

Outcomes and Impacts  

  • Examples of outcomes from R&I investment in this area: Sub-basin ODT; Intelligent environmental monitoring systems and new sensor technology; synergies between available data networks.  

  • Environmental impacts: Planning and adaptation strategies put in place to tackle environmental and climate change.    

  • Social impacts: better stakeholder engagement (incl. citizens), inter-institutional collaborations & investments. 

  • Economic impacts: Higher use of intelligent DSS by industry, municipalities and coastal communities, and potential for circular business models    

 

 

Intervention Area: Managing Sea-Uses

Intervention Area: Managing Sea-Uses

This Intervention Area addresses the need for innovative tools and approaches to the sustainable planning and management of sea-uses, interlinking maritime spatial planning (MSP), the marine strategy framework directive (MSFD), common fishery policy (CFP), and the marine protected areas (MPAs) with a focus on the regional dimension.  

 

 

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Background and rationale 

Planning and managing sea-uses are essential for sustainable resource management, conservation of marine ecosystems, conflict resolution, disaster risk reduction, economic development, and addressing climate change challenges. By adopting an integrated and holistic approach to planning and management, societies can ensure the long-term health, productivity, and resilience of the oceans, seas, and coastal areas.  

The boundaries and operational objectives for sustainable development and Good Environmental Status are defined under the European Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD). Within this framework ecosystem-based management (EBM) of human uses and Maritime Spatial Planning (MSP) plays an important role in achieving Europe’s objectives of decarbonisation and biodiversity protection by supporting more efficient use of marine space, while reducing conflicting uses and inefficiencies in transport and related facilities (EC COM (2021)240 final). MSP plays a crucial role in defining suitable space for Blue Economy sectors to operate, while assessing and mitigating their cumulative impacts and promoting coexistence with other sea uses. 

The overarching goal of this Intervention Area is to support science-based decision making that takes stock of environmental status, the legacy of human impacts, climate change trends, and future scenarios, considering multitude of pressures from uses of marine space and marine resources. The Intervention Area focuses on R&I needs related to Ecosystems-based management and Maritime Spatial Planning, aiming to support cross-border cooperation and management of marine protected areas, innovative tools for decision making that combine data from various sectors, as well as knowledge generation on areas such as Good Environmental Status (GES), the valuation of ecosystem services, and the carbon sequestration capacity of coastal restoration programs. The Intervention Area also encompasses reconstructions of seafloor changes in 4D in areas of significant natural dynamic and/or heavy human impact, R&I needs within maritime surveillance, as well as more inclusive processes for development of decision support-systems. Co-design, co-development, and co-use with MSP competent authorities at national and regional level will be essential to ensure direct capitalization of results and to widen the information basis available to relevant authorities, particularly by including socio economic data sources. 

Key thematic areas 

1. Fostering the full use of scientific knowledge for effective management and conservation   

Assessments of ecosystem health is a prerequisite for effective environmental management and conservation. Innovative research on this topic will provide essential data for the identification of suitable areas for diverse uses, minimizing conflicts and maximizing sustainable development. Ecosystem based management, including MSP, requires high resolution mapping of marine underwater morphology, and marine uses and quantification of indicators describing ecosystem distribution, health and pressures caused by human uses and of ecosystem services which will provide essential tools for ecosystem health assessment, spatial management of the marine domain, and implementation of restoration measures. The temporal evolution of the monitored variables, either abiotic (seafloor morphology, sediment dynamics, etc.) or biotic (community structure and function) are relevant for MSP, and other marine policies, notably the MSFD. Activities should address the following aspects: 

  • Research to improve understanding of the harm caused by all diverse types of litter (assessment of marine litter). 

  • Further development (and validation) of frameworks for assessment of sound impacts on populations and the ecosystem, including relation between direct responses and population consequences, spatial risk‐assessment approaches, and population modelling, considering the MSFD assessment of the distribution of reported impulsive sounds. 

  • Development of suitable population dynamics models to support the setting of absolute abundance assessment values for sensitive fish species (assessment of the Recovery in the Population Abundance of Sensitive Fish Species). 

  • Research to better implement integrated economical, ecological, and social ocean health indicators into marine ecosystem management tools. 

  • Provision of essential data for enhanced understanding of marine ecosystems and geology and effective environmental management and conservation and supporting the identification of suitable areas for different uses, minimizing conflicts, and maximizing sustainable development.  

 

2. Development of innovative Decision Support Tools (DSTs)  

MSP is recognized today as an essential tool to prevent conflict between policy priorities and to reconcile nature conservation with economic development (EC COM (2021) 240 final). Its complexity requires sophisticated tools to analyse and visualise data, assess potential conflicts, and identify optimal solutions. DSTs can significantly enhance the effectiveness and sustainability of MSP processes. By integrating multiple data sources and modelling techniques, DST will allow decision-makers to evaluate different scenarios and provide for a better-informed decision-making by considering the broader impacts and interdependencies among different sea-uses. Activities should address the following aspects: 

  • New methodologies for integrating and operationalising socio-economic and socio-ecological aspects in MSP to quantitatively estimate environmental, social, and economic benefits of MSP in present and future scenarios. 

  • Filling knowledge gaps on pressures, states, and ecosystem functioning, as well as re-use potential of relevant data from existing repositories and broader sources. 

  • Explore transboundary scenarios and multi-lateral solutions (e.g., international protected areas; protection of highly mobile species and shared stocks and resources; environmental disasters; preparedness to marine hazards). 

  • Identifying environmental and socio-economic trends and drivers and building scenarios at sea basin and sub-sea basin scale for informed adaptive planning and management.  

  • advanced models for integrating multiple disciplines to create digital intelligent supporting tools (including Artificial Intelligence based) able to consider environmental processes, anthropogenic activities (coastal and sea uses), socio-economic and socio-ecological aspects. case studies and demonstrators of the concrete added value of the developed DSTs for specific sector planning demands, with a focus on coastal areas and land-sea interactions (e.g., offshore renewable energies, aquaculture, fisheries, maritime transport, coastal and maritime tourism and multi-use of marine space).  

  • Overcoming technical and non-technical barriers in co-using advanced DSTs in institutional MSP processes. 

  • Potential application of DSTs in non-EU countries across sea basins and environmental / sectoral policy domains other than MSP. 

 

3. Enhanced Marine and Maritime Surveillance 

Maritime Surveillance includes the protection of marine resources from illegal activities (fishery control, oil spill detection, environmental degradation monitoring etc.), food security, transport safety and the monitoring of critical marine infrastructures (e.g., renewable energy and aquaculture offshore platforms), key issues for a sustainable blue economy. Different observation systems for data acquisition (satellite and stratospheric-platform, including ship-borne observations), sharing and management are the fundamental tools of Maritime Surveillance.  

Activities should explore obstacles and opportunities for:  

  • integrating platforms and services for maritime surveillance through data sharing between the existing EU and national platforms. 

  • implementing platforms allowing the integration of marine and maritime data analytics with socio-economic data.  

  • Data from maritime surveillance to inform the implementation of monitoring processes. 

  • Embedding maritime surveillance into MSP, through dedicated zoning and management measures. 

 

4. The seafloor in 4D 

The uses of the coastal regions are often defined without taking in full account the sea-floor morphology and its dynamic evolution. This additional 'temporal' aspect adds a crucial fourth dimension (hence 4D) to seafloor sampling and surveying. Innovative strategies of repeated bathymetric surveys should be adopted in dynamic coastal and nearshore areas characterized by consistent sediment transport and consequent modification of the sea floor morphology. Such 4D information, and related big data, presented via accessible tools and formats is highly relevant for MSP, from the assessment to the planning and adapting phases, including awareness raising and proper engagement of stakeholders. Activities should address the following aspects: 

  • Performing intelligent seafloor sampling surveys  

  • Assessing seafloor ecosystem health, damage/degradation of marine habitat and effectiveness of restoration measures.  

  • Representations of the sea floor, including of human impacts, through augmented reality with emphasis on public dissemination and stakeholder engagement. 

 

Implementation, enablers, and synergies  

Cash calls for R&I proposals are important to address knowledge gaps, develop solutions, and build R&I capacity within the area. There is good potential for engaging observing systems and RIs through additional activities (in-kind contributions), e.g., in relation to maritime surveillance and seafloor sampling and observation. 

Innovative governance and integration of SSH are key enablers to achieve the goals. Research and innovation efforts are needed to address the lack of data standards and challenges of combining data from a variety of sources.  

The Intervention Area will build on input from relevant projects under HE (Cluster 6 Destination 1 topics in particular). It will align with EU Missions ‘Restore our Ocean and Waters’ and 'Adaptation to Climate Change' and the DTO initiative. Among European Partnerships Biodiversa+; Artificial Intelligence (AI), data and robotics, Zero Emission Waterborne Transport, and FutureFoodS will be of relevance.  

Many organizations and initiatives at global and sea-basin scale are involved in promoting and implementing MSP, including from United Nations to the UNESCO/IOC to executing authorities of the Regional Sea Conventions to national governments implementing relevant European directives. 

Outcomes and Impacts 

  • Examples of outcomes from R&I investment in this area: enhanced capacity for R&I in support of MSP; co-designed AI-based DSTs for MSP; application of DSTs to case study areas/topics; framework conditions for a stronger ocean industry collaboration across sectors; identification of data-gaps; improved MSP plans, transferring DST results in the formal MSP processes & plans; tools for the implementation of relevant policies, strategies and directives; transdisciplinary and socio-ecological approaches for MSP processes at different scales; more coherent MSP in the same sea basin and overall; common tools and decisions and transfer of tools among stakeholders in the involved regions; several regions and MS involved in the process of MSP and development; more climate resilient and ecosystem-based MSP; improved co-design / co-planning, from strategic objectives to specific management measures; skills and education to enable use of digital support tools; 

  • Environmental impacts: avoidance of negative impacts on environment based on early identification. 

  • Social Impacts: improved public trust in the research-innovation-management chain; Improved public literacy regarding transformations of the seafloor and water mass 

  • Economic impacts: evidence-based decision making that greens the industry; decreased carbon footprint of blue economic drivers. 

 

 

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News & events

News & events

Stay up to date with the latest news, events, and success stories in building a resilient blue economy for a better future.

Featured article

Get to know our first projects

20 Feb 2024
min.

The 19 projects selected in the first joint transnational call have been invited to present themselves through this digital poster exhibition. The exhibition will be updates as we receive new posters. To navigate between posters, please hover over the image and click the arrows. 

Re-experience the "Charting the course towards a Sustainable Blue Economy" Symposium

13 Feb 2024
min.

The first Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership Symposium took place on 13-14 February 2024. If you missed the event, or would like to re-experience parts of it, you can now watch the recorded sessions at your own convenience. The Symposium brought together thought leaders, experts, and practitioners to promote the transformation towards a sustainable blue economy. 

Partnership launches second joint transnational call

2 Feb 2024
min.

The Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership is pleased to announce its second joint transnational call entitled “Unified Paths to a Climate-Neutral, Sustainable, and Resilient Blue Economy: Engaging Civil Society, Academia, Policy, and Industry».

Visit the call page for more information ->

Upcoming events

26 FEB 2024-8 MAR 2024

Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership – 2nd Call - Brokerage event

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News

Partnership decides on first batch of co-funded projects

20 Dec 2023
min.

Nineteen projects are selected for funding in response to the Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership’s first co-funded call ‘The way forward: a thriving sustainable blue economy for a brighter future.’

Paving the way for the blue transformation

26 Oct 2023
min.

Experts from across sectors and disciplines participated in a series of workshops organised by the Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership this autumn. Among them were three thematic forward-looking workshops where participants reflected on the state of play and developed recommendations for the future of the Partnership, as it is updating its Strategic Research and Innovation Agenda (SRIA).  

The Partnership Intervention Areas for activities in 2024

26 Oct 2023
min.

The General Assembly of the Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership on 19 October approved four Intervention Areas that will guide the partnership’s co-funded calls and activities in 2024. These areas point to needs for Research & Innovation activities and investments that support the necessary transformation into a green and digital ocean economy. 

Fostering research, development, and innovation for a sustainable blue economy

26 Sep 2023
min.

Brussels, 26 September 2023 - The Waterborne Technology Platform and the Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership (SBEP) announced enhanced cooperation which underlines both players’ firm commitment to develop a sustainable blue economy. 

94 pre-proposals for the 1st call

29 Jun 2023
min.

The Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership received 94 pre-proposals in the 1st joint transnational call. The deadline for pre-proposals in the call  “The way forward: a thriving sustainable blue economy for a brighter future” was 14 April 2023. The results of the pre-proposal evaluation will be later confirmed in mid-July. Shortlisted consortia will be invited to submit full proposals by 13 September. 

Kickoff meeting highlights

  • Press
  • FP1
17 May 2023
3 min.

More than 150 participants from 32 different countries took part in the kickoff meeting for the Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership in Rome on 25th January 2023.

 

Partnership kicks off in Rome

  • FP1
25 Jan 2023
min.

From 23 to 25 January, the network of 60 Partners from 25 countries and the European Commission gathers in Rome to discuss and showcase its planned activities.

Events

Ocean literacy

The Partnership will add a complementary perspective to environmentally driven ocean literacy efforts by promoting the changes in behaviours and attitudes needed to enable the just and sustainable transformation of Europe’s blue economy. This can generate interest in Europe in sustainable maritime innovations, career options, investment opportunities, and generally the quest of reconciling economic development with marine ecological integrity. Industry actors will be targeted  to help embed the  corporate environmental responsibility needed to affect the transition. The thematic foci will be guided by the Intervention Areas and align with the EU4Ocean Coalition. 

The partnership will also offer webinars about ocean literacy and communication science, and provides an ocean literacy toolkit to enable partnership beneficiaries to improve public knowledge and appreciation about their work and the opportunities in the blue economy domain. 

The Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership Ocean Literacy Toolkit is intended both for its funded projects and for the stakeholder community at large. The Toolkit will support integrating and enhancing ocean literacy efforts in their activities to promote the behavioural changes needed to enable the just transition to a sustainable blue economy in Europe.   

The toolkit is a collection of resources, including links to informative reports, networking platforms and initiatives on ocean literacy at the regional (EU4Ocean) and international (UN Ocean Decade) levels.

Reports: 

UN Ocean Decade:

EU4Ocean:

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Registration "Charting the course towards a Sustainable Blue Economy" Symposium

Registration "Charting the Course towards a Sustainable Blue Economy" Symposium

Date: 13-14 February 2024
Location: Royal Museum of Fine Arts Belgium (Rue du Musée 5, 1000 Brussels)

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In case you have any questions or requirements on the topic of GDPR and data processing and image usage, please contact info@bluepartnership.eu.

 

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Resources

Resources

This comprehensive guide provides valuable insights into your brand's values, guidelines, and visual elements, ensuring consistent and impactful brand representation across various mediums.

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Survey Stakeholder Mapping

Stakeholder Mapping Survey

The purpose of this stakeholder mapping is to establish a community of practice which will be engaged by the Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership in future exchanges related to the transformation to a sustainable blue economy. With this survey, the Partnership aims at collecting accurate data on relevant stakeholders (domain of activity, sea-basin, sector, social media channels). Please note that by stakeholders we here mean institutions, organisations, businesses, etc. We are not targeting individuals and one reply to the survey per entity is therefore sufficient.

By filling in this survey, you consent to having your data shared with the Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership. Your information will only be used internally by the Partnership. For more information, see the Partnership's Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.
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Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership’s first joint transnational call

“The way forward: a thriving sustainable blue economy for a brighter future”

The Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership, a European partnership under the European Commission’s Research & Innovation Framework Programme Horizon Europe, is pleased to announce its first Joint transnational call entitled « The way forward: a thriving sustainable blue economy for a brighter future ».

The vision of the Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership is to design, steer and support a just and inclusive transition to a regenerative, resilient, and sustainable blue economy. This EU Partnership aims to boost the transformation needed towards a climate-neutral, sustainable, productive, and competitive blue economy by 2030 while creating and supporting the conditions for a sustainable ocean for the people by 2050.

This first co-funded call aims to support transnational research and innovation projects (36 months) addressing one of the five priority areas below:

  1. Planning and managing sea-uses at the regional level
  2. Development of offshore marine multi-use infrastructures to support the blue economy
  3. Climate-neutral, environmentally sustainable, and resource-efficient blue food and feed
  4. Green transition of Blue Food production
  5. Digital Twins of the Ocean (DTOs) test use cases at EU sea-basins and the Atlantic Ocean

 

These five priority areas were selected to maximise participation while reinforcing the European blue economy through innovative solutions and improved resilience of marine ecosystems. The priority areas embrace actionable routes from science to policy to observe, assess and mitigate the impacts of climate change on vital ecological assets such as biodiversity and other ecosystem services on which our economies depend, thus supporting coastal communities.

Projects in this Co-funded call must be impact-driven contributions to the transformation into a blue economy for a more resilient future and towards carbon neutrality targets, following an impact pathway approach.

Projects must be developed at a pan-European level and in the different European sea basins: the Mediterranean, the Black Sea, the Baltic Sea, the North Sea and the Atlantic Ocean and establish close cross-sectorial cooperation in the science, innovation, and economic sectors. Projects are expected to consider several European sea basins or, at least, to consider the impact of the projects on several European sea basins.

The first Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership (SBEP) Co-funded call pools national and regional financial resources through the participation of 36 funding organisations from 23 countries (19 Member-States: Belgium, Cyprus, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, The Netherlands, 4 Associated Countries: Faroe Islands, Iceland, Norway, Türkiye and 1 third country: Brazil) responsible for funding research and innovation actions in the blue economy, with financial support from the European Commission. The total budget is about 50 Million Euros.

Apply Here

To be eligible, research consortia must include partners from a minimum of three independent legal entities from three different countries participating in the call. Self-funded partners including partners from countries (and/or regions) not participating in this Co-funded call are allowed but do not contribute to the minimum eligible consortium size. Stakeholder engagement as partners or self-funded partners is encouraged (according to national/regional regulations) to enhance innovation, policy, and societal relevance and ultimately the impact of the projects.

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Terms of Use and Privacy Policy

Terms of Use and Privacy Policy

This content describes the privacy policy of the Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership. It affects all data gathered and processed by Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership. This policy is a derivative of the GDPR, and is to be applied to Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership activities. 

General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)  

The GDPR is EU Regulation (EU) 2016/679 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 27 April 2016 on the protection of natural persons with regard to the processing of personal data and on the free movement of such data. It repeals Directive 95/46/EC. The GDPR comes in force on 25 May, 2018. More information can be found on the EC GDPR site. 

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Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership gathers personal data (name, email address, phone number, affiliation) through subscriptions on our newsletter, registrations for the Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership activities and events, and from our members. All data gathered and processed by the Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership is subject to the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which aims to protect the privacy of all EU inhabitants. Note that the Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership partly makes use of the IT system of the Flanders Marine Institute (VLIZ) to support its website and IT services. For all information regarding the data processing from the Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership website, we refer to the VLIZ privacy policy. To send newsletters Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership makes use of Mailchimp as the data processor (see point 5 below). To register participants for events in some cases the Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership uses Eventbrite as the data processor.  

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A data subject is the natural person for whom personal data is processed. Each person has the right to be informed on what personal data is being processed and to have access to their personal data. 

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Note that not all rights are absolute: the Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership can have compelling legitimate grounds that outweigh the interests and rights of the objector (accountancy, juridical reasons...). When a request is made, the Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership may demand extra information to confirm your identity. All requests made by data subjects will be logged. 

Legal grounds for data processing 

There are several legal grounds for data processing. The most common is prior consent, which can be withdrawn at any time, or it can stem from an agreement with our member institutes. The Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership further has the legal obligation to process personal data for accountancy purposes, and has to keep this data according to the legal obligations. The Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership also processes personal data for common interest as the Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership maps and describes the European marine and maritime science and innovation landscape, and gathers professional data on scientists, industry representatives, policy makers and institutes for this purpose. 

Services requiring personal data 

For some of the Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership services and activities processing of personal data is necessary. By entering your personal data, you agree to the data processing. This data is kept for as long as the agreement lasts, and at least as long as is required for legal purposes (e.g. accountancy). For purposes concerning proof in juridical disputes, Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership may store personal data up to 10 years after the occurrence, which is the maximum legal term for placing personal claims. The Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership requires personal data for the following: 

1. The Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership partners 

The Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership collects data of its partner organisations. This includes the contact details (name, e-mail, address, phone number) of the delegates and alternates and any other persons from the organisations that have been nominated to participate in the Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership Working or Expert Groups, events and publications. The Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership uses this data to inform partners on the Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership activities and for partners administration (legal obligation and reporting to the member countries and European Commission). The institutional affiliation is saved for institutional partners. 

2. Participation in (on-line) surveys 

The personal data collected depends on the type of survey, and can contain: full name, e-mail address, country, organisation name and type, telephone number.  

3. Visitor tracking on websites and cookies 

The Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership makes use of the IT support and system of the Flanders Marine Institute (VLIZ) to support its website and IT services. VLIZ keeps logs of website visits - which contain: an IP address, time information, and the url visited - for bug tracking and to monitor for malicious visits. Along with the web-server logging, an anonymous visitor-tracking system is in place, to track which pages on the websites hosted by VLIZ are accessed. We also use cookies to enhance the surfing experience (e.g. so visitors only have to log in or choose the language setting once). It is indicated on each by VLIZ supported website that cookies are used and you can find a link to the VLIZ privacy policy. 

4. Conference and other event participation 

In order to participate in events organised by the Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership, registration is required for organisational purposes (venue size, catering services, inform participants on programme updates, etc.). Registration forms will contain a section to allow participants to subscribe to further communications by the Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership, or to remove their data once the event has taken place (this is the default option). For each event, several e-mails may be sent as part of the communication agreement: save-the-date, posting of the tentative programme, abstract submission calls, closing of the early bird or final programme, and the closing e-mail with links to pictures taken and download links for presentations. 

During our events, pictures/film can be taken which can be communicated to the participant, used in Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership publications, or posted on our website and social media channels. If you do not want your pictures to be published, you can send a request for the removal of photographs or films to the e-mail address used for event administration or to info@bluepartnership.eu. Photos in which the requester are shown will be removed from our websites, social media channels and servers; for films, the film segment will be cut out or the film deleted out if the requester is clearly visible. 

5. Mailing lists organised or serviced by the Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership 

The Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership manages mailing lists which were created to send out Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership newsletters, to facilitate events, to allow for working-group communication, for partners in a project, etc. Each e-mail sent to these mailing lists contains an unsubscribe link and a contact address. For several communications, the Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership can make use of the services of Mailchimp for this purpose. Mailchimp functions in this instance as the data processor and for this reason the Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership has a data processing agreement with Mailchimp. You can find the Mailchimp privacy policy here (link: https://mailchimp.com/legal/).

6. Drupal, our content management system (CMS) 

The Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership website is created in Drupal. For content management several editors are appointed, and these need an account to be able to log in to and change a site. All session information and changes made by the editors are stored in Drupal. Each editor can list their actions for each of the sites via a Drupal module. 

Questions and Complaints 

If you have any questions regarding personal data stored by Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership, you can contact the Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership – Communications, by sending us by e-mail at info@blueeconomy.eu by phone: +32 (0)2 626 16 60 or on the following address: Rue du Trône 4, 1000 Brussels, Belgium. 

Complaints concerning the Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership privacy policy, or concerning unlawful data processing can be addressed to the Belgian Privacy Commission, the National Data Protection Authority (DPA) for Belgium. If there is a data breach, the Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership is bound to inform the Privacy Commission within 72 hours, and affected users - if identifiable - will also be notified. 

Test

About

The Partnership boosts the transformation towards a climate-neutral, sustainable, productive and competitive blue economy. We aim to restore the ocean’s health, resilience and services to people by enabling economic activity that is climate-neutral, sustainable and productive.  

Contact us

Vision

  • by 2030: give the transformation towards a climate-neutral, sustainable, productive and competitive blue economy a boost 
  • by 2050: create and support the conditions for a healthy ocean for the people 

Through this vision we work together to support key EU policy objectives of Green transition, digital transformation and recovery and ultimately contribute to the Sustainable Development Goals.  

investments
€ 450
Million planned
investments
over 7 years
partners
60
Partners &
the European Commission
countries
25
Countries

Facts & Figures

Intervention areas

Intervention Areas are set in the Annual Work Programme of the Partnership and are based on the Strategic Research and Innovation Agenda and the Member States and Associated Countries’ priorities. Intervention Areas for future calls and activities will be developed according to an annual cycle. 

Digital Twin of the Oceans at sub- sea-basin scale
Digital Twin of the Oceans at sub- sea-basin scale

Developing and validating digital twin representations of marine assets, processes or systems to provide users with answers to “what if” questions about ocean developments, including effective marine and maritime spatial planning and technology development at regional to local scales.

Blue generation marine structures
Blue generation marine structures

Developing multi-use structures across multiple offshore industries in key sectors such as transport, energy and food to create synergetic benefits and support the diversification strategy of the EU.

Planning and managing sea-uses
Planning and managing sea-uses

Innovating the management of sea-uses by integrating tools and approaches of artificial intelligence-based Maritime Spatial Planning, maritime surveillance, and the seafloor in 4D.

Healthy ‘Blue Food’ under a ’One Health’ approach
Healthy ‘Blue Food’ under a ’One Health’ approach

Promoting sustainable management of ocean bioresources and food generating capacity through integrated, unifying and nature-based approaches that benefit people, plants, animals and ecosystems.

Enabling the green transition of ‘Blue Food’ production
Enabling the green transition of ‘Blue Food’ production

Exploring technological, digital, smart and circular solutions for the just transition of Blue Food sectors into a sustainable and productive, competitive and climate-neutral future.

How can you engage?

The Partnership seeks to engage stakeholders across ocean industry sectors, policy, scientific disciplines, and civil society. You can engage in six co-funded calls over the seven-year timeframe 2022-2029. We will further add value with complementary actions and resource mobilisation, including: 

  • research infrastructures 
  • thematic programmes 
  • streamlining other funding sources  

As a Partnership, we engage with initiatives at the level of sea basins and the Atlantic Ocean. At global level, we promote the EU approach to a sustainable blue economy. We seek synergies with other Partnerships and the Mission Restore our Seas and Oceans. In parallel, we are establishing a community of practice with different stakeholders to co-design activities. 

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Regional contact nodes

Administration

  • Secretariat: Ministry of Universities and Research, Italy
  • Co-coordinator: Research Council of Norway
  • Brussels Cellule, Belgium

Sea basin nodes

  • Atlantic Ocean
    Ireland, niall.mcdonough@marine.ie
    Azores, Portugal, natalia.ospina@aircentre.org
  • Baltic Sea
    Estonia, eve.kylmallik@agri.ee, liis.kikas@envir.ee
    Poland, maciej.zdanowicz@ncbr.gov.pl
  • Black Sea
    Bulgaria, mbaltov@bfu.bg
    Turkey, melike.sevimli@tubitak.gov.tr
  • Mediterranean Sea
    Greece, akarah@gsrt.gr
    Malta, maria.azzopardi.2@gov.mt
  • North Sea
    Belgium, ann.katrien.lescrauwaet@vliz.be
    Netherlands, lisette.enserink@rws.nl
nodes

Partners

Brazil

Denmark

Faroe Islands

The Netherlands

The Netherlands

The Netherlands

The Netherlands

Stay updated






 
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Thank you page Registration "Charting the course towards a Sustainable Blue Economy" Symposium

Thank you for registering!

 

Thank you for registering to the "Charting the course towards a Sustainable Blue Economy” Symposium, 13-14 February 2024, at the Royal Museum of Fine Arts of Belgium, Rue du Musée 5, 1000 Bruxelles. Your registration is confirmed. Since we have limited availability, we kindly ask you to inform us at info@bluepartnership.eu in case you are not able to attend. You can always consult the most updated version of the programme on our website.

The Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership is currently doing a stakeholder mapping. The purpose is to establish a community of practice which will be engaged by the Partnership in future exchanges related to the transformation to a sustainable blue economy. With this survey, the Partnership aims at collecting accurate data on relevant stakeholders (domain of activity, sea-basin, sector, level of engagement, preferred communication, and contact information). We would greatly appreciate if you could take 2-3 minutes to complete the Stakeholder Mapping Survey.

 

 

The Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership’s second joint transnational call

«Unified paths to a climate-neutral, sustainable, and resilient blue economy: engaging civil society, academia, policy, and industry» 

Pre-proposal submission deadline: 10/04/2024, 15:00 CEST (Brussels Time) 
Full proposal submission deadline (Provisional): 06/11/2024, 15:00 CET (Brussels Time) 

The Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership is pleased to announce its second joint transnational call entitled “Unified Paths to a Climate-Neutral, Sustainable, and Resilient Blue Economy: Engaging Civil Society, Academia, Policy, and Industry». 

The vision of the Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership, a European partnership under the Horizon Europe Programme, is to design, steer and support a just and inclusive transition to a regenerative, resilient, and sustainable blue economy. This EU Partnership aims to boost the transformation needed towards a climate-neutral, sustainable, productive, and competitive blue economy by 2030 while creating and supporting the conditions for a sustainable ocean for the people by 2050. 

This second co-funded call aims to support transnational research and innovation projects of 36 months duration, addressing one of the four priority areas below (subject to funded priority areas by participating funding organisations, see Annex): 

(1) Digital Twins of the Ocean at regional sub basin scale 

(2) Blue economy sectors, development of marine multi-use infrastructures 

(3) Planning and managing sea-uses at the regional level  

(4) Blue Bioresources  

Projects in this co-funded call must be impact-driven contributions to the transformation into a blue economy for a more resilient future and towards carbon neutrality targets, following an impact pathway approach. 

The proposals are expected to consider a minimum of two European sea basins and to assess the project proposal’s impact on various basins. Proposals can target European regional seas such as Adriatic Sea, Aegean Sea, Arctic, Barents Sea, Celtic Sea, etc. but these regional seas must be from a minimum of 2 different European Sea basins which are: the Baltic Sea, the Black Sea, the Mediterranean Sea, the North Sea and the Atlantic Ocean. 

The second co-funded call of this EU Partnership pools national and regional financial resources through the participation of 38 funding organisations from 26 countries combined with the contribution from the European Union. 20 Member-States, 5 Associated Countries and 1 Third Country are participating: Belgium, Brazil, Cyprus, Denmark, Estonia, Faroe Islands, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, The Netherlands, Tunisia, and Türkiye. The total estimated budget is about EUR 40 million.  

To be eligible, each consortium must be composed of eligible partners from at least three different countries participating in the call and requesting financial support from at least three different funding organisations participating in the call. In addition, the projects must involve at least two independent legal entities from two different EU Member States or Horizon Europe Associated Countries (as recipients of the financial support, at the time of the closing of the call by 10/04/2024) eligible for EU funding in this call for (pre-)proposal. Self-funded partners, including partners from countries (and/or regions) not participating in this co-funded call, are allowed but do not contribute to the minimum eligible consortium size.  

Applicants are strongly encouraged to involve stakeholders (i.e., small, and medium enterprises (SMEs), industries, authorities, public administrations, associations, as well as civil society organisations) as partners or self-funded partners (according to national/regional regulations) in their proposal. Stakeholder engagement in the research projects will enhance innovation, policy, and societal relevance and ultimately the impact of the projects. 

Looking for a partner or a project to join? Use the SBEP Partner Search Tool available here.

Applicants will have up to 10 April 2024 (15H00 CEST) to submit their pre-proposals. A first evaluation of pre-proposals will be organised and the deadline to submit full proposals is foreseen for November 2024. 

This call is co-branded as part of the UN Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development, which is coordinated by UNESCO’s Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC/UNESCO) on behalf of the UN system, with the aim that the funded research and innovation projects are endorsed as Ocean Decade projects. 

Informative Webinar 

A general information webinar was organised on the 15 February (14H00-16H30 CET) to answer your questions regarding the call. You can view the slides here.  

Brokerage Event 

Ten sessions of two hours will be organised from 26 February to 8 March. Sessions are scheduled between 10:00 AM and 12:00 PM or 02:00 PM and 04:00 PM CET. The matchmaking event has the ambition to connect researchers, companies and stakeholders from marine and maritime communities interested in the Partnership's second transnational Call. To help you finding a project to join, or partners for your project, you have the possibility to set up 20 minutes meetings with other participants during the matchmaking sessions of the event. More information here.

For more information: We invite you to regularly consult our website and social media channels to be kept updated on this major research funding opportunity.  

Contact: sbep.call-secretariat@agencerecherche.fr

Annex: List of Participating Funding Organisations – Budget and funded priority areas (provisional) 

Co-branded by UNOD

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2
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Federal Science Policy Office

Abbreviated organisation name
BELSPO
Address

Boulevard Simon Bolivar 30 bte 7, 1000 Brussels

Countries
email
David.COX@belspo.be
Show on members page
On

Ministry of Climate

Abbreviated organisation name
KLIM
Address

 Suur-Ameerika 1, 10122 Tallinn

Countries
email
info@kliimaministeerium.ee
Show on members page
Off

REM

Abbreviated organisation name
REM
Countries
Show on members page
Off

National Research Agency

Abbreviated organisation name
ANR
Address

86 rue Regnault, 75013 Paris

Countries
email
Elcin.SARIKAYA@agencerecherche.fr
Show on members page
On

Regione Emilia-Romagna

Abbreviated organisation name
RER
Address

Viale Aldo Moro, 52, 40127 Bologna

Countries
email
urp@regione.emilia-romagna.it
Show on members page
Off

Spanish State Research Agency

Abbreviated organisation name
AEI
Address

Calle Torrelaguna 58 bis, 28027 Madrid

Countries
email
esther.chacon@aei.gob.es
Show on members page
On
sbep.call-secretariat@agencerecherche.fr
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Past events

About

About

The Partnership boosts the transformation towards a climate-neutral, sustainable, productive and competitive blue economy. We aim to restore the ocean’s health, resilience and services to people by enabling economic activity that is climate-neutral, sustainable and productive.  

Vision

  • by 2030: give the transformation towards a climate-neutral, sustainable, productive and competitive blue economy a boost
  • by 2050: create and support the conditions for a healthy ocean for the people

 

Through this vision we work together to support key EU policy objectives of Green transition, digital transformation and recovery and ultimately contribute to the Sustainable Development Goals.

investments
€ 450
Million planned
investments
over 7 years
partners
60
Partners &
the European Commission
countries
25
Countries

Facts & Figures

Intervention areas 2024

Intervention Areas are set in the Annual Work Programme of the Partnership and are based on the Strategic Research and Innovation Agenda and the Member States and Associated Countries’ priorities. Intervention Areas for future calls and activities will be developed according to an annual cycle. 

Digital Twins of the Ocean

This Intervention Area proposes a multidisciplinary, long-lasting research and innovation activity that focuses on the development of twin technology for spatially limited areas at sea-basin level. The activity aims to improve our understanding of the relations among essential systems at sea-basin level and ultimately support the development of AI based simulation and prediction capabilities for European oceans. 

Learn more ➝

Blue Economy Sectors

The Intervention Area covers all sectors of the blue economy, focusing on the prerequisites for a green and digital transition of these sectors and on the conditions for co-existence and multi-use of activities and infrastructures at sea. The main aim of the Intervention Area is to support the optimal use of resources in European oceans and seas in terms of space and material flows while ensuring the conditions for sustainability and reducing environmental pressures. 

Learn more ➝

Managing Sea-Uses

The Intervention Area addresses the need for innovative tools and approaches to the sustainable planning and management of sea-uses, interlinking maritime spatial planning (MSP), the marine strategy framework directive (MSFD), common fishery policy (CFP), and the marine protected areas (MPAs) with a focus on the regional dimension. 

Learn more ➝

Blue Bioresources

The Intervention Area addresses research and innovation needs to support a just transition to the sustainable production and utilization of blue bioresources, with emphasis on production and processes that minimise the environmental impacts while meeting the demand for healthy and affordable blue food, feed, and other biobased products.

Learn more ➝   

How can you engage?

The Partnership seeks to engage stakeholders across ocean industry sectors, policy, scientific disciplines, and civil society. You can engage in six co-funded calls over the seven-year timeframe 2022-2029. We will further add value with complementary actions and resource mobilisation, including: 

  • research infrastructures 
  • thematic programmes 
  • streamlining other funding sources  

 

As a Partnership, we engage with initiatives at the level of sea basins and the Atlantic Ocean. At global level, we promote the EU approach to a sustainable blue economy. We seek synergies with other Partnerships and the Mission Restore our Seas and Oceans. In parallel, we are establishing a community of practice with different stakeholders to co-design activities. 

Administration

  • Secretariat: Ministry of Universities and Research, Italy - sbep@mur.gov.it
  • Co-coordinator: Research Council of Norway
  • Brussels Cellule
    Kathrine Angell-Hansen, ka@forskningsradet.no
    Julie Olivier, j.olivier@fz-juelich.de
    Angiolo Boncompagni, angiolo.boncompagni@est.mur.gov.it
    Maurice Heral, maurice.heral@agencerecherche.fr

Sea basin nodes

  • Atlantic Ocean
    Ireland, Majbritt Bolton-Warberg, majbritt.bolton-warberg@marine.ie
    Portugal, Natalia Ospina-Alvarez, natalia.ospina@aircentre.org
  • Baltic Sea
    Estonia, Rene Reisner, rene.reisner@envir.eem, Eve Külmallik , Eve.Kylmallik@agri.ee, Liis Kikas, liis.kikas@envir.ee
    Poland, Monika Wloszek, monika.wloszek@ncbr.gov.pl
  • Black Sea
    Bulgaria, Milen Baltov, mbaltov@bfu.bg
    Turkey, Ebru Aydin, ebru.aydin@tubitak.gov.tr
  • Mediterranean Sea
    Greece, Argiro Karahaliou, akarah@gsrt.gr
    Malta, Maria Azzopardi, maria.azzopardi.2@gov.mt
  • North Sea
    Belgium, Ann-Katrien Lescrauwaet, ann.katrien.lescrauwaet@vliz.be
    Netherlands, Lisette Enserink, lisette.enserink@rws.nl

Partners

Brazil

Denmark

Faroe Islands

The Netherlands

The Netherlands

The Netherlands

The Netherlands

Stay updated






 

Additional activities

Additional activities

In addition to our core initiatives, we believe in the power of collaboration and engagement to create a lasting positive impact on our oceans and coastal communities. That's why we offer a range of additional activities that complement our mission and provide opportunities for individuals, organizations, and businesses to get involved.

Ocean literacy

The Partnership will add a complementary perspective to environmentally driven ocean literacy efforts by promoting the changes in behaviours and attitudes needed to enable the just and sustainable transformation of Europe’s blue economy. This can generate interest in Europe in sustainable maritime innovations, career options, investment opportunities, and generally the quest of reconciling economic development with marine ecological integrity. Industry actors will be targeted  to help embed the  corporate environmental responsibility needed to affect the transition. The thematic foci will be guided by the Intervention Areas and align with the EU4Ocean Coalition. 

The partnership will also offer webinars about ocean literacy and communication science, and provides an ocean literacy toolkit to enable partnership beneficiaries to improve public knowledge and appreciation about their work and the opportunities in the blue economy domain. 

The Sustainable Blue Economy Partnership Ocean Literacy Toolkit is intended both for its funded projects and for the stakeholder community at large. The Toolkit will support integrating and enhancing ocean literacy efforts in their activities to promote the behavioural changes needed to enable the just transition to a sustainable blue economy in Europe.   

The toolkit is a collection of resources, including links to informative reports, networking platforms and initiatives on ocean literacy at the regional (EU4Ocean) and international (UN Ocean Decade) levels.

Reports: 

UN Ocean Decade:

EU4Ocean:

Exploitation and Impact Network

The aim of the network is to develop tools and actions to transfer new knowledge and increase impact of the co-funded R&I projects at local, national and European level, taking into consideration different target groups: policy makers, civil society and marine and maritime industry. 

Ultimately, the Exploitation and Impact Network will contribute to a better co-creation and knowledge transfer between research industry, policy makers, and citizens by:  

  • making impact pathways mandatory at the project level;  

  • developing Open Access strategy and addressing Intellectual Property Rights;  

  • increasing the impact on the target groups needs through capacity building of the applicants to the call;  

  • promoting innovative solutions and accelerate their market uptake;  

  • bridging science policy gaps to maximise impact. 

Stay updated